SPRAGUE FAMILY HISTORY

The Sprague line appears well documented nearly all of the following information came from the Sprague Database at:

http://www.sprague-database.org/

"The Sprague Database is a computerized database (currently over 120,000 individuals and growing daily) of worldwide families of Sprague and Sprague derivative names. (Derivative names include Sprage, Spragg, Spragge, Sprags, Spraak, Sprake, Sprig, and Spriggs.) The largest sections of the data base document the descendants of (1) Francis Sprague, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1623 and (2) Edward Sprague's three sons (Ralph, Richard and William) who arrived in Massachusetts in 1629."

 

EDWARD SPRAGUE

1.Edward Sprague died 1614, a fuller, of Upway Co. Dorset, England. He had the following children:

(see Sprague Family in America pub 1913).

 

WILLIAM SPRAGUE

1. #04 William Sprague (1) was born about 1609/10 in Upwey, County Dorset, England. He resided in 1628 in Charlestown, Suffolk Co., MA. He resided Union Street, "over the river" in 1635 in Hingham, Plymouth Co., MA. (2) He signed a will on 19 Oct 1675.(3) He died on 26 Oct 1675 in Hingham, Plymouth Co., MA. (1)(4) He was christened in Upwey, County Dorset, England.

From Richard Fricke.

William Sprague immigrated to America in 1628 with his two brothers, Ralph and Richard on the ship Abigail, with Governor Endicott and landed at Salem on September 6, 1628. Ralph became a Lieutenant and Richard a Captain. The brothers were the first settlers of Charleston and are buried there. In 1629, the three brothers were listed as settlers of Charlestown. In 1635, William's wife was admitted to the church in Charlestown. In 1636, he was granted land on Union Street in Hingham, MA. He was a Selectman in 1645 and later a Constable and collector of taxes.

"Ancestral File - Ver 4.11" William Sprague (AFN:73NL-VG)

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 124.

1629. The names of Ralph, Richard and William Sprague stand at the head of the list of settlers in the record of the first meeting of the inhabitants of Charlestown.

1629. He visited Hingham in a boat.

1635. Millesaint his wife was admitted to the Church in Charlestown.

1635-6, Jan 2. His name appears for the last time in the list of inhabitants of Charlestown.

1636. He and his father-in-law obtained grants of land in Hingham and removed there, where he continued to live (except at one time he appears as a resident of Milford, MA). His house lot, on Union St. "over the river" was said to be the pleasantest lot in Hingham.

1645. He was chosen one of the seven Selectmen, "to order the prudential affairs of the town."

1651, March 28. He purchased of Thomas Hammond, "Planter" a dwelling house with 5 acres of land adjoining his own homestead, together with other lands in

that locality; also 20 acres on the opposite side of the river against the end of the aforesaid house lot.

1662. Constable and Collector of town rates.

1675, October 19. Made his will. All of the children were born in Hingham except Anthony, who was born in Charlestown.

From Nancy Johnsen Curran.

William Sprague came on the "Lyon's Whelp" in 1629. "Planters of the Commonwealth", Banks, page 61.

"The Genealogical Register", July 1930, page 324.

William Sprague, fuller, of Upwey, County Dorset, England was a settler at Salem, MA in 1628 and at Hingham, MA in 1636.

"History of Hingham", Volume II, Genealogies, by George Lincoln, 1893, repr. 1982, page 163.

William Sprague, according to the family tradition, arrived at Salem, MA, with his brothers Ralph and Richard, in 1629. On January 2, 1635/36, he was an inhabitant of Charlestown, and shortly after, his son Anthony was born there. (See Frothingham's "History of Charlestown.") He probably settled in Hingham during the summer or autumn of 1636, as land was granted to him that year on "the Playne". Other lots also were given him for planting purposes the same year, and at later dates. On the 28th of March, 1651, he purchased of Thomas Hammond, "Planter", a dwelling house with five acres of land, adjoining his own homestead. together with other lands in that locality; also twenty acres on the opposite side of the river against the end of the aforesaid home-lot. At one time he appears as a resident of Milford but returned again in a few years to Hingham.

1645 Selectman

1661 Constable

From Frank Polkinghorn, correspondent.

William Sprague, soon after marrying, made an exploratory trip to Bare Cove, later Hingham. He probably settled there in the summer or fall of 1636 as land was granted him that year on the Plain. His lot was about two miles north of the Patent Line dividing Massachusetts Bay Colony from Plymouth Colony. Other lots were granted to him for planting purposes from 1636 to 1647. On January 30, 1645, he was one of the seven men chosen to order the dwelling house and five acres of land adjoining his own homestead together with other lands in the locality; also 20 acres on the opposite side of the river against the end of the aforesaid home lot. At one time he was a resident of Marshfield but returned in a few years to Hingham. In 1662, he was the disbursing officer for the town; also Constable, Fenceviewer, etc. On February 21, 1673 he deeded his son, Anthony, certain land for L36 of lawful money of New England and L9 in merchantable corn. His will dated October 19, 1675 mentions wife Millesaint: son William; son Samuel; daughter Persis Doggett, wife of John Doggett; Joana Church, wife of Caleb Church; Mary King, wife of Thomas King, son John, and son Jonathan.

"The History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical", American Historical Society, Inc., 1920, pages 400-402.

William Sprague settled first in Charlestown, Mass., where he lived until 1636. He then removed to Hingham, landing on the side of the cove, on a tract of land afterward granted him by the town, and he was one of the first planters there. His house lot is said to have been the best situated in the town. Many grants were made him from time to time. He was active in public affairs, and was constable, fence-viewer, etc. William Sprague died October 6, 1675; his will bequeaths to his wife, Millicent, and children, Anthony, Samuel, William, Joan, Jonathan, Persis, Joanna, and Mary. He married in Charlestown in 1635, Millicent Eames, daughter of Anthony Eames, who died February 8, 1695/96.

"Genealogy (in part) of the Sprague families in America", by Augustus B. R. Sprague, page 10.

William Sprague, of Charlestown and Hingham, planter, was born in England, and was the youngest son of Edward Sprague. He married Millesaint Eames, daughter of Anthony Eames. She died February 8, 1696. He remained in Charlestown until 1636, eight years. His name is mentioned in all the town meetings, as a citizen thereof until January, 1635.

His wife, Millesaint, was admitted into the church in Charlestown in 1635, and his eldest son, Anthony, was baptized there May 23, 1636.

He came to Hingham in 1636, in a boat, and landed on the east side of the cove, on a lot of ground that was afterwards legally granted to him by the town, and was one of the first planters of the town, the name Bare Cove having been changed to Hingham, Sept. 2, 1635.

William Sprague's houselot was said to have been the pleasantest lot in Hingham; it was about two miles north of the Patent Line which formerly divided the old Massachusetts Colony from the Plymouth Colony. Many parcels of land and meadow, recorded in the "Old Grant Book,", were given to him by the town, covering a period from 1636 to 1647. These gifts indicate esteem in which he was held by his fellow townsmen.

January 30 1645, he was one of seven men chosen in town meeting to order the prudential affairs of the town.

In 1662, he was disbursing officer for the town; was also constable, fence viewer, etc.

February 21, 1673, he deeded to his son, Anthony, certain land for six and thirty pounds of lawful money of New England, and nine pounds in merchantable corn.

He died October 26, 1675.

WILLIAM SPRAGUE'S WILL

In the Name of God, Amen. The nineteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord God, One thousand, six hundred, seventy & five. I, WILLIAM SPRAGUE, senior, of Hingham, in New England, being sick in body, but yet of perfect memory; praised by almighty God! do make and declare this my last will and testament, in manner and form following: Revoking, and by these presents, making void, and of no force, all and every will and wills heretofore by me made, and declared, either by word or writing, and this to be taken only, for my last will, and none other.

FIRST and principally, I commit and commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God, and my body to the earth, to be decently buried, at the discretion of my executor hereafter mentioned, hoping of salvation, both of soul and body, by the mercies of God in the merits of my Saviour Jesus Christ. And as for such temporal estate as it hath pleased God to bestow upon me, I do order, give and dispose the same in manner and form as followeth -- that is to say:

FIRST -- I will that all those just debts and duties that I owe in right and conscience to any person whatsoever, shall be well and truly contented and paid by my Executor hereafter named out of my Estate, with my funeral charges, which I will shall be first paid.

Item -- I give and bequeath unto Millesaint Sprague, my loving wife, the sum of Ten pounds in money, and one Cow and one Horse.

Item -- I give unto the said Millesaint, my wife, ten pounds per annum during the term of her natural life, (to be paid to her by my son, William Sprague, which I have reserved for her, as may fully appear by a deed of gift under my hand and seal to my said son, William, of my house and several lands and commons, as is therein expressed, ) and the summering and wintering of one cow and one horse, and the use of one half of my dwelling house, and half the orchard, according as I have reserved upon the said deed of gift.

Item -- I give unto Millesaint, my said wife, thirty and five pounds which is due from me by my son, Anthony Sprague, to be paid five pounds a year till the whole be paid: that is to say, in case my said wife live till all the said payments be made to her: but if my wife decease, before all the said payments of thirty and five pounds be made, then my mind and will is, that what is remaining unpaid of the said thirty and five pounds at my wife's decease, shall be divided equally amongst all my children hereafter named, that is to say: my son Anthony Sprague, my son Samuel Sprague, my son William Sprague, my daughter, Perses Doggett, the wife of John Doggett, Joanna Church, the wife of Caleb Church and Mary King, the wife of Thomas King, every one of them to have part and part alike.

Item -- I give unto Millesaint, my said wife, all my household stuff and furniture, linen, woolen, and utensils of household whatsoever, for and during the term of her natural lie; and after my wife's decease my mind and will is, that it shall be divided amongst all my aforesaid children, every one of them to have part and part alike.

And all my cattle not before given to this my will, to be immediately after my decease, disposed of by my Executor, as followeth; that is to say: to my son William Sprague two steers three years old and the [?] and one cow; and all the rest of my cattle to be equally divided among the rest of my children aforenamed, every one of them to have part and part alike.

Item -- I give and bequeath unto Anthony Sprague, my SWORD, which was my brother Richard Sprague's and one of my biggest pewter platters, and twenty shillings in money; which, with what I have given him before, in Land, and other things, and his part of my household stuff and cattle, after the decease of myself and my wife, as it is afore expressed, I judge a sufficient portion for him.

Item -- I give unto my son John Sprague, a piece of salt marsh, lying at Lyford's liking river, in Hingham, containing two acres and a half, be it more or less, which was given me by the town of Hingham, to enjoy to him, and his heirs, and assigns forever. And I do give unto my son John Sprague my searge suit of apparel, which with a Neck of Upland, called Sprague's Island, lying by the aforesaid meadow which I formerly gave to him, I judge a sufficient portion for him.

Item -- I give unto my son Samuel Sprague my cloth coat, which was my brother's and one of my biggest pewter platters.

Item -- I give and bequeath unto my son Jonathan Sprague, threescore acres of Land, lying in the bounds of the township of Providence, in New England, which I lately purchased of John Dexter, of the said Providence which said threescore acres of land, I do give to my son Jonathan during the term of his natural life; and after his decease unto his heirs male, lawfully begotten of his body, lawfully begotten or to be begotten; and for want of such hairs, the said threescore acres of Land to return to the next heirs of the Spragues descended from me. Also, I give unto my said son Jonathan Sprague my best cloth suit of apparel.

Item -- I give unto William Sprague one feather bed, which the used to lodge upon when he lived with me, and one on my biggest pewter platters.

Item -- I do make and ordain Millesaint Sprague, my loving wife, my full and sole executrix of this my last will and testament.

In witness whereof, I the said William Sprague have hereunto set my hand and seal, the day above written.

WILLIAM SPRAGUE and a seal.

Signed, sealed, published and delivered by the above said William Sprague, senior, to be his last will and testament, in the presence of us witnesses.

DANIEL CUSHING, sen.

MATTHEW CUSHING.

Daniel Cushing, sen., and Daniel Cushing, jr., appeared before John Leverett, Esq., Governor, etc.

He was married to Millicent Eames (daughter of Capt. Anthony Eames and Margery Unknown (Pierce?\Prisse?)) on 26 May 1635 in Charlestown, Suffolk Co.,

MA. Millicent Eames was born in 1615 in Fordington, Dorsetshire, England. (1) She died on 8 Feb 1695/96 in Hingham, Plymouth Co., MA. (5)(6) She was buried on 8 Feb 1696.

From Elisabeth Dunbar Donavon

The date of death for Millesaint Eames is listed as 8 Feb 1695.

"Ancestral File - Ver. 4.11"

Millicent Eames (AFN:2JVC-W1) #04 William Sprague and Millicent Eames had the following children:

 

JONATHAN SPRAGUE

9. Jonathan Sprague was born on 28 May 1648 in Hingham, Plymouth Co., MA. (118)(119) (120) He was christened on 28 May 1648. He resided in 1672 in Mendon, Worcester Co., MA.(121) He died in Sep 1741 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI.(122)

From Richard Fricke.

Jonathan Sprague moved to Providence, Rhode Island.

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 132.

1671-2, Jan. 1. Was living near his brother John, and father-in-law, William Holbrook, in Mendon, MA and chosen Recorder of Mendon.

1675. Austin in Gen. Dict. RI says his father died in this year and left him a legacy of 60 acres of land in Providence.

1680, July 16. He was taxed 7 pence.

1681, May 3. Made a Freeman of Providence.

1687. His ratable estate was 2 oxen, 6 cows, 2 mares, a horse, 18 sheep, 8 acres of planting ground and 6 acres of meadow. 1687, Dec. 13. He refused to take oath as grand juror and was fined 6 shilling, 8 pence.

1695, July 2. One of a committee of seven, appointed by Gen. Assembly, to propose a method for making a rate, and also on a commission to run the eastern boundary line of the Colony.

1695, Oct 31. Was one of a committee appointed to draw up a letter in answer to the Governor of New York.

1695, 1696, 1698, 1700, 1702, 1703, 1704, 1705, 1706, 1707, 1708, 1709, 1710, 1712, 1714. Deputy to Gen. Assembly from Providence.

1701, 1702, 1703. Justice of the Peace.

1703. Speaker of the House of Deputies.

1703, Oct. 27. The Gen. Assembly ordered, in re Jonathan Sprague v. James Bick, that "the said James Bick shall, by the next sitting of the Assembly, bring under the hands of the said three brothers, Anthony, Samuel and William (Sprague), or any two of them, their result on the paragraph of their brother John's will, what shall be allowed their brother Jonathan for what he did on his brother John's land at Mendon". This James Bick had married John's widow, who was a sister of Jonathan's wife.

1703, June 22. He was one of a committee of three appointed by Gen. Assembly to "draw up a method and proceedings" of a new Court of Common Pleas.

1703-4, Jan 4. The Gen. Assembly having heard the report previously ordered in re Jonathan Sprague v. James Bick, ordered "execution should go forth agains said Bick".

1705 to 1712. He was a member of the Town Council of Providence.

1706-7, Feb. 25. He and Capt. Joseph Jeuckes were members of a commission of six to run the northern boundary line of RI.

1707. He was Clerk of the General Assembly.

1709, Oct. He and Maj. Jenckes were appointed to be assistants to the northern boundary line Commissioners.

1713, Jan 16. He was taxed 18 shilling, 6 pence.

1719, May 23. He made an agreement with his sons-in-law William Jenckes, John Teft, and Daniel Brown, deeding them his house and all his lands, they maintaining him for life and he to have choice of which son-in-law he would dwell with. They were to maintain his horse also and pay him 6 pounds a year and 25 pounds to such persons as he directed at his decease.

1719, Nov. 9. He deeded to son-in-law Ebenezer Cook certain lands.

1722-3, Feb. 23. He wrote a long letter to three prominent Presbyterian Ministers in Massachusetts in answere to one they had addressed to him and other citizens concerning the establishment of a Church in Providence. Mr. Sprague and his fellow Baptists failed to see the necessity of a Presbyterian establishment however. This correspondence gives his views in very vigorous and unmistakable terms.

1711, May 20. Proprietors of Mendon laid out to James Bick 25 acres which were a little above where is now (1891) Ballou's Bridge, and about the same time land to Jonathan Sprague, whereon he lived, which was near where is now (1891) the mill of the Harris Woolen Co. at Mill River. Bick afterwards sold his land, and Sprague part of his to William Arnold.

"History of the Early Settlement of Bridgewater", by Nahum Mitchell.

Jonathan Sprague died at Hingham, and left no posterity.

"Genealogy (in part) of the Sprague Families in America", by Augustus B. R. Sprague, page 15.

In 1672, he removed to Mendon, MA. In 1675 his father died and left to him sixty acres of land in Providence, RI, where he located before 1680. He was appointed, with others, by the Assembly to run the eastern line of the Colony. Jonathan Sprague was evidently a man of strong character, was one of the most prominent and influential citizens of his town, and served frequently in public office. He was a member of the House of Deputies for sixteen years between 1695 and 1714; Speaker of the House in 1703, and member of the Town Council, eight years, from 1705 to 1712; Clerk of the Assembly in 1707. In 1703, he, with two others, was appointed to draw up the methods and proceedings of the Court of Common Pleas. Of a decidedly religious bent, he professed the Baptist faith, and preached as an exhorter.

"Staples' Annals of Providence".

Marriage to Mehitable Holbrook is mentioned but no other marriage is indicated.

"Memorial of the Sprague Family", by Richard Soule, Jr., page 106.

Jonathan Sprague removed to Rhode Island and left no posterity.

"The Genealogy of the Sprague's in Hingham", by Hosea Sprague, page 32.

Jonathan Sprague went to Rhode Island where he had 60 acres of land given him by his father.

From Frank Polkinghorn, correspondent.

Jonathan Sprague went from Hingham to Mendon and in 1672 was living near his brother, John Sprague, and his father-in-law, William Holbrook. In 1675 his father died and left him 60 acres in Providence. In 1680 he was taxed 1s, 7d at Providence. In 1687 his ratable estate was 2 oxen, 6 cows, 2 mares, horse, 18 sheep, 8 acres planting ground and six acres meadow. On December 13, 1687 he was fined 6s 8d for refusing to take the oath as a juryman. On July 2, 1695 he was appointed on a committee by the Assembly to propose a method of making rate; also with others to run the eastern line of the Colony. He was Deputy in 1695-6, 1698, 1700, 1702-11 and 1714. In 1702 he was Justice of the Peace; 1703 Speaker of the House of Deputies; June 22, 1703 he and two others were appointed to draw up a method and proceedings of the Court of Common Pleas. In 1705-12 he was on the Town Council; in 1707 Clerk of the Assembly. On June 16, 1713 he was taxed 18s, 6d.

On May 23, 1719 he made an agreement with his sons-in-law William Jenckes, John Tefft, and Daniel Brown, deeding them his house and all lands, they maintaining him for life and he to have choice of son-in-law to live with. They were to maintain his horse also and pay him L6 and L25 to such persons as he should direct at his decease. On November 9, 1719 he deeded to his son-in-law Ebenezer Cook certain land. On February 23, 1722 he wrote a long letter to three prominent Presbyterian ministers in MA, John Danforth, Peter Thatcher, and Joseph Belcher in answer to one they had addressed to him and other citizens concerning the establishment of a church in Providence. Mr. Sprague and other Baptists failed to see the necessity of a Presbyterian church and in his letter gave his views in very vigorous and unmistakable terms. He preached as an exhorter but was not ordained (as Morgan Edwards declares in his account of the Baptists).

He was married to Mehitable Holbrook (daughter of William Holbrook and Elizabeth Pitts) on 20 Jul 1670 in Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA.(123) Mehitable Holbrook was born about 1649 in Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA.(1) She died on 29 Oct 1719 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI.(124) Jonathan Sprague and Mehitable Holbrook had the following children:

He was married to Elizabeth Harding?.

He was married to Hannah Harris (daughter of Daniel Harris and Mary Weld) on 5 Jun 1714.(125) Hannah Harris was born on 11 Feb 1669 in Middletown, Middlesex Co., CT. (126)(127)

Hannah Harris was reported as a wife by Linda Matthew.

 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM SPRAGUE

53. Capt. William Sprague was born on 2 Feb 1690/91 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI. (1)(308) He died on 20 Oct 1778 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI.(309) (1) (310)

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 143.

Capt. William Sprague was from Smithfield, RI.

1720, Oct. Was made Freeman from Providence.

1728 to 1731. Lieutenant in Providence Co. Militia.

1732. Captain in 1st Co. of Smithfield, 2d Regt. Providence Co. Militia.

1738, Aug. 28. He deeded 100 acres to his son Nehemiah Sprague.

1738, Aug. 31. He deeded "the land whereon the Baptist Meeting-house stands to certain persons for and in consideration of a Meeting-house by my leave and consent erected and built for the worship of god, by my honored father, Jonathan Sprague, James Ballow, James Walling and Richard Sprague, with the help of self and some others".

1747, Dec. 15. For fatherly love and affection he deeded 11 1/3 acres on both sides of Crookfall River, to his well beloved son and daughter Stephen Sly and Sarah Sly, of Smithfield.

1748. Citizen of Highway District No. 6.

1757, Dec. 20. He deeded for love, etc. to "dutiful and obedient son Joshua" half of the homestead in Smithfield and the easterly half of the lands in Cumberland, 300 acres, with a dwelling house near the Pawtucket River and half the barn.

1762, July 21. Joshua Sprague and wife Abigail, of Smithfield, for 1,200 pounds, conveyed land inherited from their honored father, William Sprague.

1768, April 20. William Sprague, for love and good will, and natural affection, deeded to his "dutiful grandsons" Elias and Nehemiah Sprague, and for his honorable maintenance, the homestead on Pawtucket River. "For upwards of a century the Spragues were prominent actors in the religious and political history of old Smithfield". "In the will of James Walling, Mercy is called wife of William Sprague, who was made executor, and to her was given one-third and to her children, Hannah Phillips, Joseph Cook, Abigail Cutter and Samuel Cook, also one-third.

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 581.

William Sprague of Smithfield, deeded to his son Samuel of Glocester in 1747. (Glocester Deeds, III, 146) In a Journal dated December 25, 1793, Amasa Sprague stated that his father, Samuel Sprague was the son of William of Smithfield.

"Genealogy (in part) of the Sprague Families in America", by Augustus B. R. Sprague, page 17.

William Sprague bore the rank of Captain in 2nd Regiment Providence Co. Militia in 1732. Smithfield was a part of Providence before 1730, when the tereitory was set off and the town of Smithfield incorportated. To this date, the town of Providence extended north to the Massachusetts line.

In the History of Woonsocket, RI, formerly a part of Smithfield, page 203, we read, "For upwards of a century the Spragues were prominent actors in the religious and political history of old Smithfield".

August 31, 1738, he deeded "the land whereon the Baptist meeting house stands, to certain persons, for and in consideration of a meeting-house by my leave and consent erected and built for the worship of God, by my honored father, Jonathan Sprague, James Ballou, James Walling and Richard Sprague, with the help of self and some others.

December 15, 1740, he deeded to his daughter Sarah Sly, and her husband, William, for love, etc., eleven and one-half acres.

December 20, 1750, he deeded for love, etc., to dutiful and obedient son Joshua, half of land in Smithfield and Cumberland, 300 acres, and dwelling-house on easterly part of homestead on the intervale on the west side of Pawtucket River, also half the barn.

February 9, 1754, he and his son made a division of lands above deeded.

May 21, 1762, he bought of his son, Joshua, and the latter's wife, Abigail, for $1250.00, certain lands.

April 15, 1768, he deeded for love, etd., to dutiful grandsons, Elias and Nehemiah Sprague, and for "my honorable maintenance, all my homestead where I dwell."

"Austin's Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island"

"The Genealogical Register", April 1909, page 151.

The children of William Sprague were Nehemiah, Joseph, Joshua, and Sarah (who married Stephen Sly).

He was married to Ellis (Alice) (Ales) Brown (daughter of Daniel Brown and Alice Hearndon) on 16 Sep 1714.(311) Ellis (Alice) (Ales) Brown was born on 31 May 1691 in Providence, Providence Co., RI.(1) (312) She died in 1744.(313) Capt. William Sprague and Ellis (Alice) (Ales) Brown had the following children:

He was married to Mrs. Mercy (Mary) Walling (daughter of James WALLING and Elizabeth NOX) on 26 Aug 1744. (315) Mrs. Mercy (Mary) Walling died before 1751.

 

MAJOR JOSHUA SPRAGUE

228. Major Joshua Sprague was born on 3 Jul 1729 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI. (762)(763) He resided in 1788 in Washington Co., OH.(764) He died on 1 Oct 1816 in Coal Run, Washington Co., OH. (765)(766) He was buried in Sprague Cemetery near the Old Jonathan Sprague House, Coal Run, Washington Co., OH.(767) He served in the military in Revolutionary War.(768)

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 163.

Major Joshua Sprague was a native of Smithfield, RI. Little is known of his early life. It is quite probable that his military training was acquired in the local military organizations common in those days. Soon after his first marriage his father William deeded him "300 acres of land in Smithfield and Cumberland, and dwelling house on the easterly part of the homestead on the intervale on the west side of the Pawtucket River, also half the barn".

In June, 1762, after having disposed of his farm, he with his family followed the tide of emigration into Canada for the purpose of occupying land left by the luckless Arcadians who had been carried away by order of Gov. Lawrence, in 1755. The Sprague family took up a homestead of several hundred acres at the town of Sackville, which is located on the famous Tantamar marshes, "the granery of Nova Scotia". They resided here about fourteen years. At the opening of the revolutionary War there was so much feeling against the new settlers on account of their sympathy for their brethren in revolt that they were forced to leave, losing all their possessions. Among these were the Spragues, who went first to the old home in Smithfield and later, about 1777, to East Hoosac (now Adams) Berkshire Co., MA.

For the losses sustained by these refuggees from Canada and Nova Scotia, and for the services some of them rendered the United Colonies or States in the Revolutionary War against Great Britain, Congress passed a resolution, April 23, 1783, that "whensoever Congress can consistently reward them by grants of land they will do so". An act was approved by Congress, April 7, 1798, directing "all persons having claims under the said resolution" to transmit to the War Office within two years after the passing of this act, a just and true account of their claims to the bounty of Congress. Many were slow in presenting their claims so Congress from time to time extended the time in which the claims could be made. Joshua Sprague and James Sprague, his son, and the heirs of Gilbert Seamans are mentioned as entitled to land under an act passed April 23, 1812 and that Joshua Sprague should be entitled to 960 acres; James Sprague 320 acres; and the heirs of Gilbert Seamans 320 acres of land in Ohio in what is known as the Refugee tract, which was four and one half miles wide and extended from the Scioto river in Franklin Co., east to a place in Muskingum Co. The district was set apart by act of Congress of Feb. 18, 1801. A patent was granted to Joshua Sprague, July 12, 1812, for W. 1/2 fo section 24, Twp. 12, Range 21, containing 323.96 acres and another the same day for E. 1/2 of Sec. 23, T/12, R/21, containing 327 acres, 88 perches. It appears from the records that 178 patents were issued to various refugees, the first being issued Feb. 13, 1802, and the last, March 30, 1820. But few if any locations were made in the eastern part of the strip, it being in excess of the demands of the claimants. All that part not located upon was made a part of the Chillicothe Land District, April 29, 1816.

Mr. Sprague was enthusiastic in the cause of freedom, as also were his sons. He enlisted as private in Col. Archibald Crary's Regt. in 1776; had due him 20 pounds, 12 shilling, 10 pence. In Massachusetts, he served as Major in col. Joab Stafford's (Independent) Co. of volunteers and fought in the battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777. He marched to Fish Kill, June 6, 1778, to serve nine months in Col. Diamond's Regt., but was rejected as unfit for service. However, on October 17, 1779, he enlisted as private in Capt. Asa Barnes's (1st) Co., Col. Israel Chapens' 3d Regt., and was discharged November 21, 1779, serving one month and nine days.

After the war Joshua and his sons, William and Jonathan, worked at the carpenter trade, building boats. In 1788 they left Massachusetts, going to Simrell's Ferry, on the Monongahela river. They brought their tool chest on a two-wheeled cart drawn by one horse. Here they expected to remain and build boats, but after

building several they were persuaded to come with the company that arrived at Marietta, June 22, 1788. Mr. Sprague and his two sons took a contract of building one of the block-houses and stockade called Fort Frye. Early in the spring, William and Jonathan had gone up to Waterford and cleared five acres of ground and planted corn, which produced a good crop. They lived in the stockade seven years, or until the Indian troubles were over. Joshua came into possession of a farm in Waterford Twp., on which he lived until 1812, when the infirmities of his years caused him with his wife to seek a home with their son Jonathan in Adams Twp., where their remaining years were spent. He always regretted that he went from Rhode Island to Canada. He said that he had a peck of silver dollars when he moved to Nova Scotia.

Mr. Sprague was of the hardy pioneer stock; in the military records his height is given as six feet and complexion light. He was a man of more than ordinary strength and energy, which enabled him to withstand the hardships and privations attending the settling of a new country. His descendants at the time of his death numbered one hundred and sixty-three.

Mrs. Sprague, who was of the honorable Wilbur family of RI is described as being rather tall of straight build and having dark hair.

"Genealogy (in part) of the Sprague Families in America", by Augustus B. R. Sprague, page 19.

This publication does not list the unnamed twin born in 1761 but lists two additional children, Abigail and Joshua. Joshua Sprague held rank as Major in RI. In 1762 he removed to Sackville, Nova Scotia. At the beginning of the revolutionary war he moved to East Hoosac (now Adams), Mass. He was in the Alarm Service at the battle of Bennington. He settled in Washington Co., Ohio in 1788, and died there.

"Ohio Records and Pioneer Families", Volume 20, page 154, by Budd L. Sprague.

Joshua Sprague and two of his sons Wm. and Jonathan came to Ohio in June 1788, helped build Campus Martius and was with the first group to settle Waterford, helped build Fort Frye and lived there during the Indian uprising. He came from a prominant New England family headed by William who came to Mass. in 1628 or 29. Joshua had many children who had large families and his descendants numbered 163 when he died. He fought during the Revolutionary War and his grave is marked each year to this day with a flag honoring his contribution in helping to found a Nation.

He was married to Amey Darling on 2 Jan 1748 in Cumberland, Providence Co., RI.(769) Amey Darling was born in May 1729 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI. (770) She died in May 1749 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI.(771) Maj. Joshua Sprague and Amey Darling had the following children:

He was married to Abigail Wilbur (daughter of Daniel Wilbur and Sarah Fish) on 22 Apr 1750 in Cumberland, Providence Co., RI. (772) Abigail Wilbur was born on 17 Nov 1731 in Smithfield, Providence Co., RI.(773) She died on 6 Dec 1826 in Adams, Washington Co., OH. (774)(775) She was buried in Sprague Cemetery near the Old Jonathan Sprague House, Coal Run, Washington Co., OH.(776)

"Ohio Records and Pioneer Families", Volume 20, pge 154, by Budd L. Sprague.

Abigail was dau. of Jeremiah and Mary (____) Wilbur of Smithfield R. I. where Joshua Sprague was born. They later moved to Nova Scotia then East Hoosick, Mass. and in 1789 Joshua returned to Mass. from Ohio and brought his wife and family to Marietta and that same Spring to Waterford where they settled. Joshua and Abigail were originally buried in the Old Sprague Cemetery now on the Devol Farm and later their graves, with some others, were moved to their present site.

Major Joshua Sprague and Abigail Wilbur had the following children:

 

JONATHAN SPRAGUE

723. Jonathan Sprague was born on 9 Jan 1767 in Sackville, Nova Scotia, Canada. (1575) He died on 1 Apr 1840 in Adams Twp., Washington Co., OH. (1576)

He was buried in Sprague Cemetery near the Old Jonathan Sprague House, Coal Run, Washington Co., OH. (1577)

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 203.

Jonathan Sprague was a farmer and millwright. At the age of twenty-one he came to Marietta and with his father and brother took the contract of building one corner of Campus Martius. He was at the Waterford Garrison with other members of the Sprague family during the Indian War. The Indians would often prowl around the fort and frequently shot at the men of the garrison while they were out gathering garden and other supplies. Jonathan Sprague, while out in the woods with others, was shot at, and the bullet grazing his chest cust seven holes through his shirt. At another time the Indians drove off the cows of the settlers. Jonathan located them at an Indian village near a creek emptying into the Muskingum river two miles below Zanesville. The fort volunteered a company which was led by Jonathan Sprague to attack the village. They pushed a loarge scow up to the mouth of the creek and then proceeded on foot. The Indians were gone, except a few old men and squaws. They burned the village, tied the Indians to trees and then loaded the cows on the scow. They had just pushed out into the river when the forerunners of the Indians came to the bank and proceeded to follow them down the river. However, the Indians were afraid to attack. The creek was named Jonathan Creek, for Mr. Sprague.

After peace was secured he located in Adams Twp. on the bottom opposite Coal Run, and in the year 1800 built the stone mansion which was occupied by him the remaining forty years of his life. In 1803, he built the famed Island Mill. A wing was built out into the Muskingum river to secure water power. The mill was operated by the Spragues until recent years, although it is not standing now. His saw mill turned out the lumber that was used in the construction of the famous Blennerhassett house, on Blennerhassett Island, in the Ohio River. There is still preserved in Marietta a walnut cupboard made by him with a "broad-ax and drawing knife".

Jonathan Sprague, while not very religious, was a man of strong moral character and his life was one of great usefulness to the community in which he lived. His hospitable home was ever made use of by the people who came from twenty miles around to have their grist ground. In stature, he was tall, borad shouldered and strong, though the Indian who shot at him remoarked that he would have killed that Sprague had he not been so flat-chested.

His first wife, Sabra, was a lady of fine accomplishments and of unusual vivacity. His second wife, Susannah, was the daughter of the first white woman to arrive in Marietta in 1788. Jonathan's descendants are scattered through many states and are numerous and respected.

"Ohio Records and Pioneer Families", Volume 20, page 156, by Budd L. Sprague

Jonathan Sprague was one of the sons of Joshua Sprague who came with his father to Ohio in 1788 and helped build a part of Campus Martius and Fort Frye.

He was married to Sabra Seamans (daughter of Gilbert Seamans and Martha Alger) on 18 Mar 1792 in Waterford, Knox Co., OH. Sabra Seamans was born on 30 Apr 1767. She died on 2 May 1815.(1578) She was buried in Sprague Cemetery near the Old Jonathan Sprague House, Coal Run, Washington Co., OH.(1579) Jonathan Sprague and Sabra Seamans had the following children:

He was married to Susannah Owen (daughter of James Owen and Mary Gardner) on 11 Feb 1816 in Marietta, Washington Co., OH. Susannah Owen was born in 1784 in MA. She died on 6 Oct 1833. (1586) She was buried in Sprague Cemetery near the Old Jonathan Sprague House, Coal Run, Washington Co., OH. (1587) Jonathan Sprague and Susannah Owen had the following children:

He was married to Hannah Newell (daughter of James Newell) on 6 Mar 1834. Hannah Newell was born on 19 May 1788 in Berkley, Bristol Co., MA. She died on 17 Jul 1867 in Adams Twp., near Lowell, Washington Co., OH. (1592) She was buried in Sprague Cemetery near the Old Jonathan Sprague House, Coal Run, Washington Co., OH. (1593)

 

SEAMANS SPRAGUE

Seamans Sprague was born on 3 Apr 1821 in Coal Run, Washington Co., OH. He died on 30 Mar 1897 in Kinderhook, Pike Co., IL.

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 280.

Seamans Sprague remained with his father in Washington Co., OH until he was nineteen years old, when he was married to Miss Devol. In November 1852, he removed with his family from a farm near Coal Run to Illinois locating on a farm two miles south of Kinderhook. He resided here eighteen years and after making numerous improvements on the land, sold out, and removed to Missouri, where he lived four years. Not being satisfied with the country he returned to Pike County and bought a farm on which he resided the rest of his life, enjoying the comforts which his thrift had provided. Mr. Sprague was a man possessing many excellent traits of character, a zealous Christian and Deacon in the Baptist Church many years.

He was married to Mary Powers Devol (daughter of William Devol and Sarah Silvius) in 1840 in Beverly, Washington Co., OH. Mary Powers Devol was born on 24 Nov 1820 in Beverly, Washington Co., OH. She died on 17 Jan 1908. Seamans Sprague and Mary Powers Devol had the following children:

Buried: Old Kinderhook Cemetery, Kinderhook Township, Pike County, IL

The cemetery is in two sections - the dividing line between the old and new is unclear. It is located in Kinderhook township and in the town of Kinderhook in section 24. Highways 36 and 96 run thru the town.

 

MARY MATILDA SPRAGUE

3251. Mary Matilda Sprague was born on 14 Dec 1842 in Coal Run, Washington Co., OH.

"Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 368.

Mary Matilda (Sprague) Hull was educated in the graded schools of Barry, IL. She was superintendent of the W. C. T. U. home at Quincy, IL in 1905.

She was married to James Norton Hull (son of Thomas HULL Rev. and Mary SMITH) in 1860 in Kinderhook, Pike Co., IL. James Norton Hull was born in 1836 in Kinderhook, Pike Co., IL. "Sprague Families in America", by W. V. Sprague, page 368.

James N. Hull was educated at Quincy College. Mary Matilda Sprague and James Norton Hull had the following children:

Buried: Akers Chapel Cemetery, Kinderhook Township, Pike County, IL (This cemetery is located in the southeast 1/4 of Section 10 of Kinderhook township. It can be reached by going 2 miles northwest from Kinderhook on Route 57, then take Route 96 north 1/2 mile to Akers Chapel Church. The cemetery is on the hill behind the church.)

 

JENNIE BETHANY HULL

Jennie Bethany Hull was born February 18, 1868 in Pike County, Illinois. She died January 12, 1954 in Kansas City, Missouri at the age of 85. She was baptized August 16, 1868. She and her husband were active in the Methodist church. She married Frank Wesley Osborn on August 24, 1888 and had the following children: