OSBORN FAMILY HISTORY

 

HENRY S. OSBORN

Born: June 6, 1814 - London, England

Immigrated to United States 1834

Died November 29, 1895 – Los Angeles, California (age 81)

Married: Mary Smith in 18833

- Born: in Essex County, England

- Died: in Quincy Il, 1849

Children:

Married: Sarah A. Carter on December 31, 1850

- Born: in Quincy, Illinois or Morgan County, IL (?)

- Died: in Los Angeles, CA

Children:

Buried: Henry S. Osborn mausoleum in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Illinois

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HENRY S. OSBORN is a well-known and influential citizen of Quincy, in whose affairs he bears a prominent part, occupying at the present time the position of president of the Quincy Coal Company. He is social, benevolent and energetic, and has an established reputation as a business man. He discharges the duties of citizenship in a reliable manner, and to whatever position he is called brings a determination to faithfully serve his fellow-men and deal honorably in every particular.

He of whom we write is a native of London, England, his natal day being June 6, 1814. He received good educational advantages in his native land preparatory to business life, but did not have the opportunity of completing his schooling, as his father died when he was quite young and he was thrown upon his own resources. When seventeen years of age, he learned the trade of a miller, which business he followed with success in Essex County, England, until 1834, when, having determined to try his fortune in the New World, he emigrated to the United States, and landing in New York City, immediately located in Steuben County, that State. There he engaged in milling for a time, and later, going to Waverly, Ohio, was identified with its business interests until 1846, the date of his advent into the Gem City.

Soon after locating in Quincy, Mr. Osborn formed a partnership with James E. Jones and John Wheeler, under the firm name of Jones, Wheeler & Co., and with them carried on a thriving business as millers for about forty years. Later, our subject acquired an interest in the Eagle Mills with his former partner, with whom he was connected for forty years, when the mills were burned in 1887, and the site is now occupied by the Seger Wholesale Grocery House.

Mr. Osborn has always taken a prominent part in local affairs, and in 1880 was appointed by Gov. Cullom to represent the State of Illinois with the members of the Mississippi Valley Commission at the annual meeting held at St. Louis. He is a man of much decision of character, with intelligent and pronounced views on all subjects, particularly in the matter of politics, acting with the Republican party. He has served two terms in the City Council, representing the First Ward, and has contributed largely of his means toward the upholding of Quincy and its general improvement, and has thus proved a valuable acquisition to the citizenship of this locality. His prompt and methodical business habits, good financial talent and tact in management of affairs, have placed him in the foremost rank among the prominent business men who have contributed largely to the financial prosperity of this portion of the State. At the present writing he is President of the Blessing Hospital Association, Trustee of the Woodland Home, Director of the First National Bank, Director of the Quincy Gas Light and Coke Company, holds a similar position in the Quincy Paper Company and is President of the Quincy Coal Company.

The lady who became the wife of our subject in 1833 was born in Essex County, England, and bore the maiden name of Mary Smith. She was a very intelligent and cultured lady and at her death, which occurred in 1849, left two children: William, who was elder, is now deceased, and Charles, who is Superintendent of the Quincy Coal Company. In 1850, Mr. Osborn chose as his second wife Miss Sarah Carter, of this city, and to them have been born a daughter and son, Alice C., deceased, and Harry C., Treasurer of Quincy Coal Company. Mr. Osborn and wife are influential members of the Vermont Street Baptist Church, in which denomination he has been Clerk and Deacon for many years. Their attractive residence is a large frame structure, surrounded by well laid out lawns and is pleasantly located at the corner of Second and Spring Streets.

Pages 314 & 317

Portrait and biographical record of Adams County, Illinois: containing biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens : together with biographies and portraits of all the presidents of the United States.
Chicago: Chapman Bros., 1892, 593 pgs.

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H. S. Osborn, Leading Manufacturer, or "Men of Mark" in Quincy

We come now to one who has been eminently successful in one of the most important branches of our manufactures, and who has also wielded a large influence in municipal affairs.

H.S. Osborn, senior member of W. H. Osborn & Co., is a native of England, where he was born June 6th, 1814. Passing his youth in the city of London, where he was born, he there received his education, and when about twenty years of age, emigrated to the United States. He first located in New York city, where he remained two years, at the expiration of which time he removed to Circleville, Ohio, and engaged in the milling business. At the end of three years, he changed his location to Waverly, Ohio, where he again embarked in the milling enterprise. For nine years he continued at Waverly, after which he came to Quincy, arriving here in August, 1846. Purchasing an interest in the old "Eagle Mills" that stood at the corner of Broadway and Front streets, he continued to operate it as one of the firm of Wheeler, Osborn & Co., until it was destroyed by fire. The firm at once proceeded to replace the building destroyed, and in 1852 completed a splendid new edifice, and furnished it with all the equipment and machinery for a first-class flouring mill. This was subsequently sold to the C.B.&Q.R.R. Co., and removed to supply the demand for more yard room. It was upon the sale of this building that the present colossal structure known as the "Eagle Mills" was erected. It was completed in 1867, and is in every respect one of the finest establishments of its kind in the Union. Its equipments are of the most modern style, its machinery of the most approved pattern, and its improvements of the most convenient order.

It is now operated and managed by the firm of W. H. Osborn & Co., of which, as we have said, Mr. Osborn is senior partner, and is one of the most successful institutions of our city.

In addition to being one of the most successful of our citizens, Mr. Osborn is also one of the most valuable. Several times elected to the City Council, his services in that body were marked and beneficial to the city. He has been active in every public enterprise, and his contributions to the charitable institutions of Quincy have been on a scale of liberality equaled by few.

A thorough business man, a generous and enterprising citizen, none have contributed more to improve and advance Quincy than H. S. Osborn.

History of Quincy and Its Men of Mark, 1870. Page 237-238

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Henry S. OSBORN was born in London. He came to Quincy in 1846, and for many years gave his energies principally to the manufacture of flour. In recent years he has given more attention to other lines of business and now, the Eagle Flouring Mills, having been destroyed by fire, he is giving his attention to the numerous business enterprises in which he is interested. He is president of the Quincy Coal Company and is principal owner. He is also a director of the First National Bank, director of the Quincy Gas-light & Coke Company, director of the Quincy Paper Company and an officer in several benevolent organizations. Mr. OSBORN is one of Quincy's oldest and most respected citizens.

QUINCY ILLUSTRATED, Quincy, IL: Quincy Daily Journal, 1889. page 55-56.

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Biography of H. S. Osborn

OSBORN H.S., President Quincy Coal Co.; office Front and Broadway; residence southeast corner 2d and Spring streets; born in London in 1814; came to Rochester, N.Y. in 1834; thence to Pike county, O., in 1837; went into the milling business; came to Quincy in 1846, and erected the Eagle Mills; married Miss Sarah A. Carter in 1850. She was born in Morgan county, Ill., in 1848<sic>. They have two children: C.C. and H.C. Are members of the Baptist Church. He is a Republican. He took the management of the Quincy Coal Co. in August, 1875. He has been Alderman of the 1st Ward six years.

The History of Adams Co., Illinois, Murray, Williamson & Phelps, Chicago, 1879. Page 672. (transcript)

(Note: there appear to be at least two errors in the above: it is doubtful if Sarah Carter was born in 1848 if she was married in 1850. Also, informal family records show her born in Quincy, not Morgan County. The son H.C. is most likely William H. instead.)

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The founder of the family was the late Henry S. Osborn, who was born in London, England in 1814. He settled in Rochester, NY in 1834, moved in 1837 to Pike Co., OH, and in 1846 came to Quincy. Henry S. Osborn died in 1895. Henry S. Osborn married Sarah A. Carter. They had two sons, William H. born in 1840 and Charles C. born in 1842.

Quincy and Adams Co., IL, Hist. and Representative Men, Vol. II, The Lewis Pub. Co., Chicago + NY, 1919.

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The founder of the family was the late Henry S. Osborn, who was born in London, England, in 1814. He settled in Rochester, New York, in 1834, moved in 1837 to Pike County, Ohio, where he was in the milling business, and in 1846 came to Quincy and erected the Eagle Mills. He came to Quincy by way of canal and river. His partner in the Eagle Mills was John Wheeler. Their first plant was at the foot of Broadway on Front Street. When the Burlington Railroad was built to Quincy they moved their property to Second Street and Broadway. The mill was burned about 1855, and soon afterwards the railway acquired the property for their present freight house. About that time Mr. Wheeler retired from the business. Henry S. Osborn then became interested in the coal business about 1859, and for many years was president of the Quincy Coal Company, a wholesale and retail and mining business. The company had extensive mines at Colchester, Illinois, where they sunk and drained thirty-one coal shafts. The product from these mines was widely distributed at Quincy and for many of the river boats then plying up and down the Mississippi. The mines were continued until they were exhausted in 1912. For many years the Quincy Coal Company has had its offices at the foot of Broadway. Henry S. Osborn continued the active management of the business until his death in 1895, and he was then succeeded by his son Charles C. Osborn, who finally sold his interests to Mr. M.E. White.

Henry S. Osborn married Sarah A. Carter. Henry S. Osborn was a republican and served a number of years as alderman from the First Ward. He and his wife had two sons, William H., born in 1840 and Charles C., born in 1842.

Quincy and Adams County, Vol. II, Chicago and New York, The Lewis Publishing Co., 1919. Page 960. (transcript)

http://home.att.net/~osborne_origins/biograph/bio_c.htm

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OSBORN H. S. & :CO., (J. Wheeler), manufacturers Eagle Mills flour, north west corner Front and Broadway.

Osborn Henry S., firm of H. S. 0. & Co., and agent St. Louis and Keokuk Packet Co., wharf-boat; residence south east corner Second and Spring.

1866 Quincy City Directory by O. E. Root

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The costly and extensive establishments employed in the manufacture of flour that tower Quincy now, were not built in a day. – When Osborn, and Bagby and others who have been largely responsible in making Quincy a great flour mart commenced that arduous work, they operated in no such noble structures as the present "Eagle," "Tellico," or "Castle" mills, but were confined to more modest and less capacious establishments. However, with such men, no matter how humble their beginning, success was only a question of time. Ripe with sagacity, full of energy, and alive with enterprise, each year witnessed some new improvement, some needed addition to their establishments, until almost unperceived, success was achieved, and they found themselves at the head of colossal mills, not surpassed by those of the great cities of the east. There was no longer any question as to the feasibility of profitably manufacturing flour in Quincy, and many embarked in the enterprise. We have now ten establishments engaged in its manufacture, most of them model concerns, with all the improvements which experience has recommended. Several of these mills, the Eagle, Castle, Tellico, City, &c., have a capacity of 300 barrels per day, and all of these are almost constantly kept running…

NAME OF MILLS. FIRM. CAPACITY PER DAY

Eagle Mills W. H. Osborn & Co., 350 barrels

Castle Mills Bagby & Wood, 300 "

Tellico Mills Dick Bros., 350 "

City Mills C. E. Whitmore 300 "

Star Mills Wheeler & Cruttenden 100 "

Quincy Mills Monning Bros., 100 "

City Springs Mills W. Hunerwadel 100 "

Centre Mills Allen & Whyers, 300 "

Farmers’ Mill Crocket & Mason 150 "

Royal Mills Osborn & Naylor

History of Quincy and Its Men of Mark, 1870. Page 25, 26

(Eagle Mills, started by Henry S. Osborn was taken over by his eldest son, William H. Osborn. The younger son, Charles C. Osborn, started Royal Mills).

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The Quincy coal company is an organization composed principally of Boston capitalists, although some Quincy men also have interests therein. The general office is located at Boston, but the working headquarters are at Quincy. They operate five shafts in Colchester, all the mining of the company being done here, and have a capital stock of $75,000. The shafts number 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25, the latter one being lately opened. The average depth to the seams worked is from 85 to 90 feet, the seam being known as a 30-inch vein. The coal is of an excellent quality and is well adopted for both blacksmith use and gas making, and is known as seam No. 2, of the Illinois section. The seam is worked by the men while laying on their sides, the coal being mined by pick, sledge and wedge. All their shafts are operated by steam power and are all connected with each other, except No. 20, thus giving ample air passages and perfect means of escape in case of accident or fire. All their cages are provided with safety catches and covers, and the company comply with every requirement of the law, thereby providing amply for the comfort, convenience and safety of the miners. They have good top men and use five-eighth screens, giving the workmen the benefit of all the coal they mine. They have on their pay roll between two and three hundred men. The coal is wheeled from the rooms through the entries in reaching the shaft proper, before raising, which are three and a half feet in height and six feet in width. The company own about 400 acres of land, with reserved mining rights under all land which they sell. Their principal market is Quincy, a regular coal train running from the mines to that place daily, the number of cars to the train varying from 12 to 24. They also have a large transient and general trade. The annual production of the mines, as taken from the report of the Bureau of labor statistics, is 71,718 tons, with a capacity of 100,000 tons, the mines being worked the year around. They also have ample sidetrack facilities, with a line of road to every shaft. H. S. Osborn of Quincy, is president of the company, and Charles C. Osborn of the same place, is superintendent. Henry Arundel is the representative of the company at Colchester, and Thomas Terrill is mine boss, with John Terrill as assistant.

History of McDonough County, Illinois, 1885, Continental Historical Co., Springfield, Illinois

http://www.macomb.com/~ilmcdono/Colchester1885.html

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Illinois Marriage Records:

GROOM BRIDE COUNTY DATE

OSBORN, H S CARTER, SARAH ADAMS 12/31/1850

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1840 Pike County OH Census Index

Name Page Township of Residence

Osbern, Henry S. 017 Pee Pee-Waverly 00001-100010001

http://www.scioto.org/Pike/censuses/1840/1840-index.html

 

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An obituary was published in the Quincy Daily Herald on November 29, 1895 that reported his death.

 

CHARLES C. OSBORN

Born: January 19, 1842 – Waverly, Ohio

Died: December 1, 1923 – Quincy, Illinois (age 80)

Married Mary Rebekah Missouri Arthur: April 18, 1864

Born: June 30, 1841 – St. Louis, MO.

Died: November 19, 1914 – Quincy, IL (age 73)

Children:

- Born Jan 19,1865

- Married July 8 1901 to Olive Smith (born 10 Sep., 1876)

- Born August 24, 1867

- Married August 24, 1888 to Jennie Bethany Hull (born February 18, 1868)

- Born May 24, 1872

- Married August 22, 1893 to Edwin A. Hedges (born September 16, 1866)

- Married August 9, 1945 to C. R. Frazier

- Born November 26, 1876

- Married September 24, 1902 to Wilbur Rutherford Lemley (born April 12, 1875)

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Biography of Charles C. Osborn

The founder of the family was the late Henry S. Osborn, who was born in London, England in 1814. He settled in Rochester, NY in 1834, moved in 1837 to Pike Co., OH, and in 1846 came to Quincy. Henry S. Osborn died in 1895. Henry S. Osborn married Sarah A. Carter. They had two sons, William H. born in 1840 and Charles C. born in 1842.

On 4/14/1864 Charles C. Osborn married at Quincy Miss Mary Arthur who was born in St. Louis 6/30/1841. Mrs. Osborn died in Nov. 1914.

Quincy and Adams Co., IL, Hist. and Representative Men, Vol. II, The Lewis Pub. Co., Chicago + NY, 1919.

(Marriage date is most likely in error – should be 4/18/1864).

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CHARLES C. OSBORN. One of the oldest names of the commercial life of Quincy is that of Osborn. The Osborn family came here over seventy years ago and they have been successively identified with milling, the coal business, and other extensive affairs.

The founder of the family was the late Henry S. Osborn, who was born in London, England, in 1814. He settled in Rochester, New York, in 1834, moved in 1837 to Pike County, Ohio, where he was in the milling business, and in 1846 came to Quincy and erected the Eagle Mills. He came to Quincy by way of canal and river. His partner in the Eagle Mills was John Wheeler. Their first plant was at the foot of Broadway on Front Street. When the Burlington Railroad was built to Quincy they moved their property to Second Street and Broadway. The mill was burned about 1855, and soon afterwards the railway acquired the property for their present freight house. About that time Mr. Wheeler retired from the business. Henry S. Osborn then became interested in the coal business about 1859, and for many years was president of the Quincy Coal Company, a wholesale and retail and mining business. The company had extensive mines at Colchester, Illinois, where they sunk and drained thirty-one coal shafts. The product from these mines was widely distributed at Quincy and for many of the river boats then plying up and down the Mississippi. The mines were continued until they were exhausted in 1912. For many years the Quincy Coal Company has had its offices at the foot of Broadway. Henry S. Osborn continued the active management of the business until his death in 1895, and he was then succeeded by his son Charles C. Osborn, who finally sold his interests to Mr. M.E. White.

Henry S. Osborn married Sarah A. Carter. Henry S. Osborn was a republican and served a number of years as alderman from the First Ward. He and his wife had two sons, William H., born in 1840 and Charles C., born in 1842.

After selling his interest in the coal business Charles C. Osborn retired, and is now spending his declining years in a comfortable home at 816 Spring Street. He has always been one of the good and stanch citizens of Quincy, and has contributed largely to the hospitals and other worthy causes. His brother William was for a number of years a Mississippi River boatman and was clerk on the old "Divernon" running between St. Louis and Keokuk. He died in 1877, leaving a widow and two sons.

On April 14, 1864, Charles C. Osborn married at Quincy Miss Mary Arthur, who was born in St. Louis June 30, 1841. They lived together a happy period of half a century and on April 14, 1914, were privileged to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary. Mrs. Osborn died a few months later, in November of the same year. She was reared and educated in St. Louis. Her parents were natives of Ireland but were members of the Methodist Church. Mr. and Mrs. Osborn had their church home in the Vermont Street Church for many years. Mrs. Osborn was a teacher of the primary department of the Sunday school for twenty years. For over a dozen years Mr. Osborn served as trustee of the church. When his wife died the church presented him and his children with a splendid testimonial as to her long continued and faithful membership.

Mr. Osborn's oldest child is Charles A., born January 19, 1865. He is a resident of Quincy and married Olive Smith. Frank W., the second son, was born August 24, 1867, and is now in the real estate and loan business at Kansas City under the firm name of Lemley and Osborn. He married Jennie Hull and they have a son, Arthur, born in 1900. Alice Osborn, born May 24, 1872, is the widow of Mr. Hedges, and she and her daughter Mary E. Hedges, now a student in the Quincy High School, reside with her father. Mary Ann, the youngest child, born November 24, 1876, is the wife of William R. Lemley, of the firm Lemley & Osborn at Kansas City. Mr. and Mrs. Lemley have two sons, Frank and Robert, both students in the Kansas City High School.

Quincy and Adams County, Vol. II, Chicago and New York, The Lewis Publishing Co., 1919. Page 960. (transcript)

http://home.att.net/~osborne_origins/biograph/bio_c.htm

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The Quincy coal company is an organization composed principally of Boston capitalists, although some Quincy men also have interests therein. The general office is located at Boston, but the working headquarters are at Quincy. They operate five shafts in Colchester, all the mining of the company being done here, and have a capital stock of $75,000. The shafts number 20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25, the latter one being lately opened. The average depth to the seams worked is from 85 to 90 feet, the seam being known as a 30-inch vein. The coal is of an excellent quality and is well adopted for both blacksmith use and gas making, and is known as seam No. 2, of the Illinois section. The seam is worked by the men while laying on their sides, the coal being mined by pick, sledge and wedge. All their shafts are operated by steam power and are all connected with each other, except No. 20, thus giving ample air passages and perfect means of escape in case of accident or fire. All their cages are provided with safety catches and covers, and the company comply with every requirement of the law, thereby providing amply for the comfort, convenience and safety of the miners. They have good top men and use five-eighth screens, giving the workmen the benefit of all the coal they mine. They have on their pay roll between two and three hundred men. The coal is wheeled from the rooms through the entries in reaching the shaft proper, before raising, which are three and a half feet in height and six feet in width. The company own about 400 acres of land, with reserved mining rights under all land which they sell. Their principal market is Quincy, a regular coal train running from the mines to that place daily, the number of cars to the train varying from 12 to 24. They also have a large transient and general trade. The annual production of the mines, as taken from the report of the Bureau of labor statistics, is 71,718 tons, with a capacity of 100,000 tons, the mines being worked the year around. They also have ample sidetrack facilities, with a line of road to every shaft. H. S. Osborn of Quincy, is president of the company, and Charles C. Osborn of the same place, is superintendent. Henry Arundel is the representative of the company at Colchester, and Thomas Terrill is mine boss, with John Terrill as assistant.

History of McDonough County, Illinois, 1885, Continental Historical Co., Springfield, Illinois

http://www.macomb.com/~ilmcdono/Colchester1885.html

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Osborn Charles C., clerk, mill, corner Front and Broadway; residence south east corner Fifth and Spring.

1866 Quincy City Directory by O. E. Root

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Illinois Marriage Records:

GROOM BRIDE COUNTY DATE

OSBORN, CHARLES ARTHUR, MARY R ADAMS 04/18/1864

 

WILLIAM H. OSBORN

(brother of Charles C. Osborn)

Born: 1840

Married: Kate Morehouse on December 24, 1863 (?)

William was for a number of years a Mississippi River boatman and was clerk on the old "Divernon" running between St. Louis and Keokuk. He died in 1877, leaving a widow and two sons.

Quincy and Adams County, Vol. II, Chicago and New York, The Lewis Publishing Co., 1919. Page 960. (transcript)

http://home.att.net/~osborne_origins/biograph/bio_c.htm

 

 

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Osborn William H., clerk, mill, corner Front and Broadway; residence Second west side 1st door north Broadway.

1866 Quincy City Directory by O. E. Root

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Illinois Marriage Records:

GROOM BRIDE COUNTY DATE

OSBORN, WILLIAM MOREHOUSE, KATE MRS ADAMS 12/24/1863

 

FRANK WESLEY OSBORN

Born: August 24, 1867

Died: July 12, 1946 – Kansas City, Missouri (age 78)

Married August 24, 1888 to Jennie Bethany Hull

Born: February 18, 1868 – Pike County, Illinois

Died: January 12, 1954 – Kansas City, Missouri (age 85)

Children:

Frank and Jennie B. were active in the Methodist church.

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Illinois Marriage Records:

GROOM BRIDE COUNTY DATE

OSBORN, FRANK W HULL, JENNIE B ADAMS 08/24/1888

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Frank W., the second son, was born August 24, 1867, and is now in the real estate and loan business at Kansas City under the firm name of Lemley and Osborn. He married Jennie Hull and they have a son, Arthur, born in 1900.

Quincy and Adams County, Vol. II, Chicago and New York, The Lewis Publishing Co., 1919. Page 960. (transcript)

http://home.att.net/~osborne_origins/biograph/bio_c.htm

 

 

 

ARTHUR SPRAGUE OSBORN

Born: February 2, 1900 - Quincy, Illinois

Died: June 14, 1972 – St. Louis, Missouri (age 72)

Married: Ruth Iva Mae Keal

- Born February 26, 1898 – Thomasboro, Illinois (or Arcola, Illinois per Harry Osborn birth cert., defense papers)

- Married August 3, 1922

- Died: April 18, 1981 – Redondo Beach, California (age 83)

- Buried: Henry S. Osborn mausoleum in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Illinois

Children:

- Born November 22, 1923 – Kelso, Washington

- Born January 1925 – Kelso, Washington

- Born December 21, 1926 – Kelso, Washington

- Born April 20, 1928 – Kelso, Washington

- Born October 29, 1931 – Denver, Colorado

- Died August 13, 1993 – Washington, D.C. (age 61)

Buried: Henry S. Osborn mausoleum in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Illinois

SS#: 202-05-0757

Last Residence: Sun City, California 92381

Profession: Salesman (per Harry Osborn birth cert.), inventor, Mechanical Engineer

Employment History: (included Honeywell)

Notes: Perfected the B-29 Flying Fortress "shaking stick", an early version of an autopilot; worked on designing early parking meters, many more.

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MR. & MRS. ARTHUR S. OSBORN FAMILY BIBLE:

Page 1:

With much love from Father and Mother Osborn, 1939

Bible Center:

The Arthur S. Osborn – Family Record

Births:

Arthur Sprague Osborn at Quincly, Illinois, Friday, February 2, 1900

Ruth Iva Mae (Keal) Osborn, Thomasboro, Ill., February 26, 1898.

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Betty Lucille Osborn, Kelso, Washington, November 22, 1923

Eleanor Anne Osborn, Kelso, Washington, January 19, 1925

Neva Jean Osborn, Kelso, Washington, December 21, 1926

Harriet Jane Osborn, Kelso, Washington, April 20, 1928

Harry Hull Osborn, Denver, Colorado, October 29, 1931

 

 

HARRY HULL OSBORN

Born: October 29, 1931, 702 S. Corona St., Denver CO

Died: 19 Aug 1993 – Washington, D.C. (age 61)

Married:

Wiley Barbara Dean Burnett – married January14, 1956

Divorced March 4, 1981

Children:

Married:

Seng Hee Ku, Seoul, Korea, married December 28, 1981

Divorced July 10, 1986

SS#: 469-26-0884

Cause of death: Metastatic lung cancer

Last Residence: 9323 Scotch Haven Drive, Vienna, VA

Buried: Manassas, Virginia

 

 

 

OSBORNE - Know Your Name

By J.C. DOWNING

From http://members.aol.com/workaide/osborne/name/

OSBORN(E), OZBUN

This is an Old Norse name compounded from Os "good" and Beorn "bear." The early Saxons used the word BEORN in a poetic sense for "man," thus giving the name a connotation of "god-like" rather than the literal sense of "god-bear."

The Old Danish name Asborn "god-bear" was in use in England before it was reinforced by the Normans at the time of the conquest.

In England, Henry Osburn appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 1260. Henry Osbern of County Cornwall, John Osebarn of County Sussex, Waiter Osborn of Cambridgeshire and Andrew Housborn and Walter Hoseborn of Somersetshire lived in the period 1297-1327. Elena Usburne was on the 1379 Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls. Some other early spellings were Orsborn, Osborne, Osbourn(e), Osband, Usborne and Hosborn.

In Scotland, the single names Osbernus, Osbern and Hosbern appear in records between 1097 and 1180. John Osburn was a voter in County Angus in 1513. Harie Osburn(e) was in Ayrshire in 1648.

Burke's General Armory describes the arms for one Ausborne, three Osborn, one Osborne Wyddel, 19 Osborne and two Usborne-each different.

In Virginia, Jenkin Osborn, Lt. Thomas Osborn, Ralph Osborn and John and Mary Osborn arrived in James City County in 1617-1624, and Capt. Thomas held land there prior to 1637. Jenkin was granted 400 acres in Charles City County in 1635, and his son was granted 1,300 acres there in 1637. Ralph held land in Elizabeth City County in 1635. Edward was granted 400 acres in Henrico County in 1636. John was granted 300 acres in James City County prior to 1637.

William Osborn or Osburn was in Providence, R.I., after 1630. Richard was in Fairfield, Conn., after 1635. Christopher was in Duxbury, Mass., in 1638. Jeremiah was in New Hampshire in 1632.

Four men of the spelling Osborn were officers in the American Revolutionary Army.

The 1790 United States Census lists one or more of the spellings Osbern, Orsboren, Osborn(e), Osburn. Ozabarn, Ozborne and Ozburn(e) in Maine. Maryland, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York, North and South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia.

http://members.aol.com/workaide/osborne/name/

 

OSBORN SPELLINGS

From http://www.family-tree.freeserve.co.uk/branches/spelling.htm

While researching family history, we read many original documents and one fact that never fails to amaze is the originality and diversity of spelling by the scribes of the past. Standards of spelling in general, and surnames in particular, just did not appear to exist. There are, theoretically, well over two thousand possible ways to spell Osbom and in my research 1 have encountered over one hundred and twenty different forms. Other names are similarly blessed with a plethora of different spelling forms. Why does this happen? Why are so many spelling variations found?

Essentially, today we are all relatively well educated and cannot comprehend a time when illiteracy was the norm. We therefore expect spelling forms of the past to be as consistent as they tend to be today. However, until mass illiteracy was tackled there was little or no requirement for a uniform spelling system in the English language even among the literate. Indeed, even Shakespeare spelt his own name four different ways. The first real attempts to introduce a standard English spelling system were made by the Board Schools in the 1870's. Before this time Parish Clerks of the Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries - among the more literate of the population - tended to be poorly educated by our standards and their spelling appears to our modern eyes to be more cavalier than 'accurate'. However since there was no standard system for spelling at that time, the question of accuracy didn't arise! They also had to contend with the vagaries of the spoken word in local dialect (see Chapter 20) and consequently had a great tendency to spell phonetically.

To illustrate this point in her book 'Further Steps in Family History' it is not surprising that Eve McLaughlin selects the name Osbom as an example :-

"May 6 baptised John Osborn sun to John Osbourne

May 8 buried the said John Usband sonne to Husband the Miller.

Usbome, Hosbome, Asburn are other standard variants of that name..."

I could also list Aspern, Azbone, Hosbin, Ozband, Oddsbond and Washebume among the more exotic forms of spelling 1 have encountered. In my own particular branch of the family, the spelling form Osborn has been in continuous use from Daniel Osbom onwards (circa 1700) with a multitude of other spellings thrown in along the way. No matter how obtuse the spelling, it always reverts to Osbom.

Throughout this paper 1 have used original spellings as they occur in the records, although appearing gallant rather than accurate. All quotes from original sources are printed in italic but, where necessary, my comments are included in square brackets, for example "P[ai]d to Henry Gay by order of the p[ar]ish".